In collaboration with UNEP and WMO and with the support of Science- Policy Interface experts, the Secretariat has been developing a global sand and dust storm base map to meet this need and provide an initial data set at global level.

Discussions during the high-level segment will take the form of three parallel ministerial round-tables and three consecutive interactive dialogue sessions, as follows:

Round tables held in parallel

Round table 1

Land, climate and renewable energies

Round table 2

Rural and urban communities: failing or prospering together

Round table 3

Promoting a global movement for ecosystem restoration

Interactive Dialogues Held ConsecutivelyInteractive Dialogues Held Consecutively

Interactive dialogue 1

An axiological approach to responsible land management

Interactive dialogue 2

Healthy lands for a healthy population

Interactive dialogue 3

Stimulate a sustainable value chain for businesses with land-based activities

To assist delegations in preparing for the high-level segment, the secretariat has prepared an information note (ICCD / COP (14) /INF.2) outlining some of the issues that participants will be asked to consider in their deliberations. This note is summarized in the sections that follow.

Salient points to be raised during meetings 

1

The adaptation and mitigation process climate change effects based on rehabilitation and land management are they complementary to the global transition to renewable energies ?

2

What should the conclusion of the United Nations Climate Summit and other climate the role of land-based or nature-based solutions in the fight against climate change ?

3

How to solve problems related to land, climate and biodiversity simultaneously ?

4

How balancing soil pressures for food, energy and other environmental services when they are potentially competing?

5

How can we maximize the benefits of access to renewable energy for rural communities, land and climate ? What is the analysis of business for more land investments in this scenario?

Round table 1: Land, climate and renewable energies

Land management remains an underutilized means of fighting climate change. Yet, investments in land management are beneficial in many ways, as outlined in the infographic below.

The problems of climate change and land degradation are interconnected, and so are the solutions to these problems. Non-renewable energies are one of the causes of climate change, which exacerbates weather problems, including drought. In addition, a shift to renewable energy will provide economic opportunities for land-based businesses, particularly in the areas of agriculture, forestry, traditional manufacturing, and green tourism. However, it is important to study the various renewable energy options and their impacts, because it is not because they emit little or no GHGs that they have no impact on the environment, especially on the environment. state of the land. Thus, biomass could pose as many problems as it would solve if it were actually produced on a large scale. On the other hand, solar energy and wind power seem to be able to provide solutions that would lead to both lower GHG emissions and better land management.

 Salient points to be raised during meetings 

1

How to manage pressures that zones urbaines exercise on the ground, especially in peri-urban areas ? La integrated planning peut-elle aider ?

2

What could be the contribution of a circular economy system to solve this problem?

3

The green jobs in rural areas could they help reduce unplanned urbanization?

4

What changes in governance would be needed to strengthen the capacity of local government authorities to play a proactive role?

5

How to generate situations where the benefits are mutually beneficial (win-win)? How create efficient "rural-urban" communities (rural-urban) ?

Round Table 2: Rural and Urban Communities - Fail or Prosper Together

Land management is strongly linked to issues of residential areas, healthy housing, and access to water and food. Rural and urban areas each have their own issues and connected issues, and the significant displacement of populations from rural areas to urban areas that we are currently witnessing around the world also generates many challenges, as explained in the paper. infographic next. The global trend is to increase population, and this increase is greater in cities than in rural areas.

In addition, migration out of rural areas poses a challenge for relocation and access to healthy homes. This question goes hand in hand with the need to create jobs and a good quality of life. The people currently living in extreme poverty are overwhelmingly located in rural areas, where lack of employment is more pronounced. It should be noted that in some countries the trend is reversed because of the aging of the population. A synergy between the Convention and the World Urban Forum (WUF10) to be held in Abu Dhabi in 2020 could provide interesting answers to these questionsIn addition, migration out of rural areas poses a challenge for relocation and access to healthy homes. This question goes hand in hand with the need to create jobs and a good quality of life. The people currently living in extreme poverty are overwhelmingly located in rural areas, where lack of employment is more pronounced. It should be noted that in some countries the trend is reversed because of the aging of the population. A synergy between the Convention and the World Urban Forum (WUF10) to be held in Abu Dhabi in 2020 could provide interesting answers to these questions (http://wuf.unhabitat.org/).

Salient points to be raised during meetings 

1

How ambitious should be in the measures taken? How ensure that the restoration offers multiple advantages ?

2

What are the best ways to guarantee the Participation in Stakeholders so that ecosystem restoration becomes a way of life ?

3

Should we explore local, national or regional approaches ? Are there particular regions or initiatives that the UNCCD can join?

4

How to make sure that the restoration is integrated at planning the use of soil, aux budgets governments and investment strategies private sector

5

Can a global movement for ecosystem restoration ensuregender equitythe sécurité occupation and equitable benefits ?

6

How can a global movement for restoration be exploited to support the job creation or ensure a sustainable socio-economic development ?

7

Are opportunities generated by NDT properly mapped and understood at the national and sub-national levels? Can the NTD goals, many of which include restoration and rehabilitation measures, be synchronized with the SDGs, NDCs and the Decade of Ecosystem Restoration?

8

What are the social, economic and environmental guarantees when designing projects / restoration programs as part of public-private partnerships ?

Round Table 3: Promote a world movement for reinstating ecosystems

This roundtable connects the work of the UNCCD with that of other institutions working on land restoration in a wider movement of sustainable development. The IPCC will present at this round table the results of a report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security and GHG fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. In concrete terms, an ecosystem restoration movement would be based on voluntary targets. In this regard, it is important to highlight the efforts already made: 122 Parties participating in the UNCCD NDT Program have set targets for land restoration and rehabilitation, and the 60 countries participating in the Bonn Challenge for reforestation of Degraded lands have committed a total of 170 million hectares. The following infographic summarizes the state of play, based on document ICCD / COP (14) /INF.2 (draft) prepared by the secretariat. How to create efficient "rural-urban" communities (rural-urban) ?

Salient points to be raised during meetings

1

What are the implications of a value-based approach to land management for future consumption and production patterns, and for SLM strategies

2

Would faith-based development initiatives help to promote social peace and interfaith harmony ?

3

How to better recognize indigenous knowledge and traditional and learn from them?

4

How to encourage socially responsible private investment ?

5

How does the concept of intergenerational justice does it apply to the parties to the Convention?

Interactive Dialogue 1: An Axiological Approach to Responsible Land Management

Faced with the overexploitation that the land is undergoing is emerging an ethical movement of land management. Its actors have variable starting points, but seem to gather around the desire to change the patterns of production and consumption, through different approaches, both in relation to their careers and their lifestyles. This change in values ​​is mainly attributed to the challenge of climate change, to which the younger generation is particularly sensitive. It is therefore this younger generation that is driving change.

For this dialogue, the UNCCD focused on different value systems that can be used for better land management. Ministers and Heads of Delegations will be presented with the positions taken by actors from faith-based organizations, indigenous communities, and private sector members engaged in socially responsible activities. Faith-based organizations are often close to the most vulnerable populations, and have begun to develop actions that take into account the protection of the environment. In addition, according to the World Bank, if indigenous people represent only 5% of the world's population, they own, occupy or use a quarter of the planet's surface, and preserve 80% of the remaining biodiversity on their ancestral lands through complex systems. Finally, many private sector players are now investing responsibly and trying to change the way they do business, because today the sector is expected to become more accountable and achieve greater transparency.

Put in context: best practices for sustainable land management

Salient points to be raised during meetings

1

How to promote a knowledge and an sensitization Governments and local populations facteurs de risque de la DLDD pour la santé ?

2

How to take advantage of behavior change communication approaches that have been used successfully in the health sector?

3

How can the health and land management sectors work together? What are the necessary administrative and regulatory measures? What about collecting sex-disaggregated data?

4

Would this contribute to improving the health and overall resilience of the population? Is this a profitable investment?

5

How améliorer le partage des données, le suivi et la surveillance ?

6

Should we refine our guidelines on mapping and assessing the risks, vulnerabilities, hazards and exposures impacted by DLDD?

7

Should land restoration target drought hotspots or anthropogenic sources of sandstorms and dust storms?

8

How should health services evolve to reflect environmental reality?

Interactive dialogue 2: Healthy land – healthy people

Objective 2 of the 2018-2030 Strategic Framework is to improve the living conditions of the population. This dialogue aims to highlight the complex consequences of soil degradation on human health. Land degradation leads, on the one hand, to reduced access to healthy and complete foods, quality water and hygiene; and on the other, an increase in water contamination, the presence of pathogens in water and food, and air pollution. All of this greatly affects the lives and survival of people, especially the most vulnerable, including children and the elderly.

Food security exists only when people have genuine physical and economic access to nutritious foods that meet their dietary needs and dietary preferences so that they can lead healthy lives. The adverse food impacts of DDTS range from malnutrition risks to reduced nutritional value of food due to depletion of micronutrients in the soil or lack of diversity in food production.

Water is not only necessary for humans for its consumption, but also for its hygiene, and again the DDTS has adverse effects, both in terms of quantity and quality of water. When water bodies lose volume during periods of drought, contaminants are found in greater concentration in the remaining water. In addition, high temperatures stimulate the multiplication of pathogens. In addition, the erosion of ecosystems releases pollutants that are then found in the water. It can also be noted that the rates of poisons and carcinogenic toxins are increasing in human populations. They are related to the massive use of pesticides in unsustainable land use patterns.

Land degradation also has several effects on the movement of pollutants and pathogens. Airborne pollutants, which can travel quickly across borders, cause and contribute to many health problems by attacking the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, eyes, skin, etc. This circulation of pollution, especially allowed by dust storms, is still facilitated on degraded lands. In addition, migration that is caused by climate change and land degradation also carries the risk of spreading disease in humans and livestock, but also causes psychological damage due to the uncertainty experienced by families. displaced.

Au titre de l’objectif 2 du Cadre stratégique, les Parties à la Convention visent une amélioration de l’accès à une nourriture et à une eau saines. S’il faut traiter la maladie elle-même et non pas uniquement ses symptômes, l’accomplissement de cet objectif passe par le maintien de services écosystémiques, donc par la préservation des écosystèmes et la réhabilitation des terres dégradées.

Salient points to be raised during meetings 

1

What opportunities exist for sourcing products from arid or restored areas?

2

What are the steps needed to make environmental sustainability and social guarantees part of global supply chain models?

3

To what extent is the creation of global consumer demand essential to the development of new value chains for low-profile, but lucrative, dryland products?

4

What are the obstacles and risks that could hinder private sector investment in drylands? How to cure it ?

5

How can small producers and entrepreneurs access the markets, financing and other means of production needed to develop new value chains in local or international markets?

6

In a world of local ingredients and international flavors, do local products have the potential to move globally and contribute to the development of new food habits and cultures?

Interactive Dialogue 3: Stimulating a sustainable value chain for businesses with land-based activities

This dialogue will focus on the potential beneficial impact, for the drylands, of sustainable production and consumption patterns for products originating from these regions. Drylands account for 40% of the land area, and 2 billion people live there, 90% of which is in developing countries. It is estimated that 25 to 35% of these territories are already degraded. Although traditional agriculture remains an important economic activity, it is important to enable rural communities to diversify their production and economic activities. The solution may come, for example, from botanical species, since some of the most lucrative come from arid areas. These species remain little known in the rest of the world, but their sustainable exploitation is possible. Policymakers and administrators can play a crucial role in connecting small producers with local and international markets.

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